Three Exhortations to Remember in Times of Suffering

I've been thinking a lot about suffering lately, mostly because current events surrounding COVID-19 seem to have brought suffering to the forefront of the news even moreso than usual. I am not personally suffering right now, but I do spend a lot of time worrying about potential suffering. So, of course, when all this virus…

On Killing Sin: Three Major Areas of Unbelief

There are certain life events that reveal to us if we really believe what we say we believe. At eight months pregnant, I can say that the prospect of having a baby has definitely been an occasion for such reflection. My due date is quickly approaching, and with it, my anxiety has increased. I'm afraid…

“But I tell you, love your enemies…”

If there was any question about whether or not Jesus' kingdom ethic is counter-cultural, the Sermon on the Mount should remove those doubts. Jesus is speaking to his disciples about what it means to live as a citizen of a different kingdom. He repeatedly reminds his listeners of the conventional wisdom of their day. He…

Why do we need to confess our sin to others?

I recently finished reading If You Only Knew: My Unlikely, Unavoidable Story of Becoming Free. You can read my review of it here but suffice it to say that it's a good book and you should read it. One thing about the book that has stayed with me is the idea of confessing sin to…

“Gospel-centered” Must Mean More Than the Preaching

"A gospel-centered church is not one where the preacher preaches the gospel, but where the people share the gospel." ~John Meador A couple of weeks ago, I commented on an article at Christianity Today by John Meador of First Baptist Euless, TX. Meador writes about his church's return to evangelism as an every member ministry.…

What Exactly is the Normal Christian Life?

I have a friend from Iran. He has a fascinating story. Formerly a Muslim, he and his wife left Iran on a false asylum account, claiming it was for freedom. They lived for a while on an island in the Mediterranean where my friend was introduced to a Persian Christian community. It had been started…

Whites living as minorities in the new American city

Census projections have opened a window into the America of 2050, "and it’s Houston today," said Stephen Klineberg, a sociology professor at Rice University. I pulled the above quote from the center of a Los Angeles Times article showcasing Houston as the most diverse city in America. The article begins at a high school soccer…

Immigration may beat a century-old record

As of 2015, the United States had set one record in immigration, and it may be on pace to break another one. According to the most recent data from Pew research, the United States is now home to over 43.2 million international immigrants. That is more than any other time in the country's history. It…

A Japanese Perspective on American Christianity from 1926

His name was Kanzo Uchimura. Uchimura was a prominent Christian leader in Japan during the early part of the twentieth century. He was born in Japan during the end of the previous century to a prominent family. He grew up, as many of the Japanese elite of that era, ascribed to Confucion philosophy. He was…

“Missions is the Mother of Theology”

I did not come up with this headline, a guy by the name of Martin Kähler did. Kähler was a theologian himself, from Germany, and was making a very important point when he penned these words. In fact, it is significant enough that it bears repeating. In short, Kähler is claiming missions birthed theology.  Put…